Overview

We formed in May 1990 under our mother club, The Rotary Club of Mbabane. We used to meet at Mountain Inn every Thursday evening but moved to our own club house within Ekwetsembeni school. We meet on Thursday evenings from 18:00 to 19:00. For direction see the map here. We welcome visitors at our meetings, please confirm in advance on our contact page of your intention to visit as we occasionally meet elsewhere.

We started with a few Charter members but have grown into one of the largest clubs in Eswatini today.

We raise money through local projects such as Sibebe Survivor and also work with other Rotary Clubs and organisations, locally and abroad, to support various sustainable projects. We are part of Rotary District 9400 which includes Rotary Clubs in Eswatini, Mocambique, Botswana and South Africa. We have two Rotaract Clubs and three Interact Clubs. We also run RYLA camps in Eswatini.

Object of Rotary

From Left: Silvester Schiele, Paul P. Harris, Hiram E. Shorey, Gustavus Loehr
Paul Harris’ desire for camaraderie among business associates brought together these four men and
eventually led to an international organisation of service and fellowship. Chicago, 23 February 1905

The Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise and, in particular, to encourage and foster:

  1. The development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service;
  2. High ethical standards in business and professions; the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations; and the dignifying of each Rotarian’s occupation as an opportunity to serve society;
  3. The application of the ideal of service in each Rotarian’s personal, business, and community life;
  4. The advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional persons united in the ideal of service.

The Four-Way Test

(Of the things we think, say or do)

The Four-Way Test is a nonpartisan and nonsectarian ethical guide for Rotarians to use for their personal and professional relationships. The test has been translated into more than 100 languages, and Rotarians recite it at club meetings:

  1. Is it the TRUTH?
  2. Is it FAIR to all concerned?
  3. Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS?
  4. Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?

Avenues of Service

We channel our commitment to service at home and abroad through five Avenues of Service, which are the foundation of club activity.
Club Service focuses on making clubs strong. A thriving club is anchored by strong relationships and an active membership development plan.
Vocational Service calls on every Rotarian to work with integrity and contribute their expertise to the problems and needs of society. Learn more in An Introduction to Vocational Service and the Code of Conduct.
Community Service encourages every Rotarian to find ways to improve the quality of life for people in their communities and to serve the public interest. Learn more in Communities in Action: A Guide to Effective Projects.
International Service exemplifies our global reach in promoting peace and understanding. We support this service avenue by sponsoring or volunteering on international projects, seeking partners abroad, and more.
Youth Service recognizes the importance of empowering youth and young professionals through leadership development programs such as Rotaract, Interact, Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA), and Rotary Youth Exchange.

Grace

For food in a world where many walk in hunger;
for faith in a world where many walk in fear;
for friends in a world where many walk alone,
we give you humble thanks, O Lord.

Rotaract

Rotaract clubs bring together people ages 18-30 to exchange ideas with leaders in the community, develop leadership and professional skills, and have fun through service.
In communities worldwide, Rotary and Rotaract members work side by side to take action through service. From big cities to rural villages, Rotaract is changing communities like yours.
Rotaract members decide how to organize and run their clubs, manage their own funds, and plan and carry out activities and service projects. Rotary club sponsors offer guidance and support and work with the club as partners in service.
Check with your university or contact a local Rotary club to find out if there’s a Rotaract club in your area. Contact the Rotaract club to find out how you can join its next meeting, service project, or social event.

Interact

Interact clubs bring together young people ages 12-18 to develop leadership skills while discovering the power of Service Above Self. Find out how serious leadership can be seriously fun.
What are the benefits?
Connect with leaders in your community and around the world to:
Take action to make a difference in your school and community
Discover new cultures and promote international understanding
Become a leader in your school and community
Have fun and make new friends from around the world
What’s involved?
Interact clubs organize at least two projects every year, one that helps their school or community and one that promotes international understanding. Rotary club sponsors mentor and guide Interactors as they carry out projects and develop leadership skills.
Celebrate the global impact of Interact by getting involved in:

  • World Interact Week
  • Interact Video Awards
  • Rotary Youth Day at the United Nations
  • Global Youth Service Day

How do you join?
Check with your school or contact a local Rotary club to find out if there’s an Interact club in your area. Contact the Interact club to find out how you can join its next meeting, service project, or community event.
Follow Interact on Facebook to see how Interact clubs are having fun through service.

RYLA

Do you have what it takes to become a dynamic leader and change yourself and the world?
Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) is an intensive leadership experience organized by Rotary clubs and districts where you develop your skills as a leader while having fun and making connections.
What are the benefits?
Connect with leaders in your community and around the world to:

  • Build communication and problem-solving skills
  • Discover strategies for becoming a dynamic leader in your school or community
  • Learn from community leaders, inspirational speakers, and peer mentors
  • Unlock your potential to turn motivation into action
  • Have fun and form lasting friendships

What’s involved?
RYLA events are organized locally by Rotary clubs and districts for participants ages 14-30. Depending on community needs, RYLA may take the form of a one-day seminar, a three-day retreat, or a weeklong camp. Typically, events last 3-10 days and include presentations, activities, and workshops covering a variety of topics.
Your community might host a RYLA event for secondary school students to hone their leadership potential, for university students to develop creative problem-solving strategies, or for young professionals to learn ethical business practices.
How can I participate?
RYLA participants are nominated by local Rotary clubs. Contact your local Rotary club to find out more about RYLA events in your area, how to apply, and any costs of getting involved.

Join our club

Impact starts with our members — people like you who see a world where people unite and take action to create lasting change — across the globe, in our communities, and in ourselves.
At club meetings in communities across the continent our people of action come together to strengthen their connections to friends and neighbours and their commitment to improving lives.
Who can join?
We are looking for people who want to give back to their communities.
How can I become a member?
Visit our club meetings and learn about Rotary from us. We will show you what we are all about and explain to you what is required to become a Rotarian.
What are the benefits?
Becoming a Rotary member connects you with a diverse group of professionals who share your drive to give back. Through regular meetings and events, you’ll:

  • Discuss your community’s needs and develop creative ways to meet them
  • Connect with other leaders who are changing the world
  • Expand your leadership and professional skills
  • Catch up with good friends and meet new ones

What’s expected of me?
As a club member, you will be asked to:

  • Pay club dues
  • Attend meetings and events
  • Use your professional skills and talents to make a difference

If you’re between the ages of 12 and 30, you may be interested in joining one of our service clubs for young professionals and youth. Like Rotary clubs, Rotaract and Interact clubs give their members the chance to make friends, develop leadership skills, and create positive change. Learn more about Rotaract and Interact clubs.

Global & District Grants

Global grants support large international activities with sustainable, measurable outcomes in Rotary’s areas of focus. By working together to respond to real community needs, clubs and districts strengthen their global partnerships.
Global grants can fund:

  • Humanitarian projects
  • Scholarships for graduate-level academic studies
  • Vocational training teams, which are groups of professionals who travel abroad either to teach local professionals about their field or to learn more about it themselves

The minimum budget for a global grant project is $30,000. The Rotary Foundation’s World Fund provides a minimum of $15,000 and maximum of $400,000. Clubs and districts contribute District Designated Funds (DDF) and/or cash contributions that the World Fund matches. DDF is matched 100 percent and cash is matched at 50 percent. Global grants are the best example of Rotarians and clubs worldwide working together.
District grants fund small-scale, short-term activities that address needs in your community and communities abroad. Each district chooses which activities it will fund with these grants.
You can use district grants to fund a variety of district and club projects and activities, including:

  • Humanitarian projects, including service travel and disaster recovery efforts
  • Scholarships for any level, length of time, location, or area of study
  • Youth programs, including Rotary Youth Exchange, Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA), Rotaract, and Interact
  • Vocational training teams, which are groups of professionals who travel abroad either to teach local professionals about their field or to learn more about it themselves

Districts may use up to 50 percent of their District Designated Fund to receive one district grant annually. This percentage is calculated based on the amount of DDF generated from a district’s Annual Fund giving three years prior, including Endowment Fund earnings.

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